Redefining Disability Week 6 – How Disability Affects the Activities of Every Day Life

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Most of the time I’m so busy with every day life that I don’t stop to think about how much the special abilities of my children affect our activities. However, now that I think about it, most of the activities people take for granted take diligent effort with and for our children.

1. Getting Dressed

Our children are all able to dress themselves, but one son in particular has sensory issues which makes it a struggle to introduce any new pieces of clothing. He only wears “soft” things and will fight tooth and nail if we ask him to wear anything he deems inappropriate. It also takes our boys two or three times longer than most people to get dressed. Two of our boys don’t have the dexterity to get dressed any faster. Our other son is constantly distracted. Like most teens, our boys need to be reminded to change their clothes every day. 🙂

2. Eating

I’m thankful that our children are all able to feed themselves. Two of the boys are able to pour their own milk or water, but the other one needs help unless we want liquid all over the table and floor. It’s not that he needs to be more careful; he just doesn’t have the physical control necessary. At age fourteen, our twins are just starting to cut their own meat. It’s still a challenge, and sometimes the meat ends up on the floor or in their laps.

3. Making Lunches

One of our boys is able to make his lunch independently, but I still need to check and make sure he takes an appropriate amount of food with him. (He often has trouble figuring out whether he’s hungry and when he eats, he doesn’t feel full.) One of the other boys is able to spread mayonnaise or butter on his sandwiches, but cannot cut cheese slices. Our other son is a PBJ sandwich fan (but he takes sunflower buttter sandwiches to school due to other student’s nut allergies.) He’s able to make his sandwiches independently.

4. Toileting

Many of the people who have the same genetic anomaly our boys have are not able to use the bathroom independently. All three of our boys are independent, but may pull their pants down before they get the door closed, or come out before their pants are pulled up properly, or forget to wash their hands. One of our boys also still has toileting accidents on a regular basis. When we travel, we have to plan our bathroom breaks ahead of time. Even then, he still soils himself at times.

5. Specialized Equipment

We have two children who wear hearing aids. This means we need to check and maintain them regularly, instill the habit of wearing the hearing aids and storing them properly, and remember to take them out before baths or swimming. We are finally at the stage where both children are able to put their own hearing aids in – sometimes totally independently.

We have three children who wear glasses. Only one of them is able to clean them independently. All of them have fallen with their glasses on and broken them. (When the children were small, the glasses caused injury on occasion when the children fell down.) One son has been known to hurl his glasses across the classroom when he’s angry, or stomp on them, or just snap them in half.

5. School

Our boys have required assistance at school since they started preschool. One of our boys does grade level work, but needs his work “chunked” or he gets overwhelmed. When he doesn’t understand something, he sits in his chair and may shut down if a teacher or assistant doesn’t intervene. Our other two boys are good readers, but only able to participate at the level of a five to seven year-old. Now that our boys are teenagers, the difference between them and their peers is increasingly evident.

6. Sports

Our boys are not able to participate in sports at the same level as their peers. We have participated in skating, hockey, baseball, curling, and basketball. However, the participation takes a lot of extra effort on our part as parents, coaches, boys, and their peers.

7. Community Activities

Our boys would rather stay at home than participate in many activities that are an expected part of most people’s lives. One of our boys is very sensitive to sound and gets scared easily (especially by balloons and brooms – not sure why!). Our visits to playgrounds, Farmer’s Markets, sporting events, etc. are often a challenge.

Each day is a new adventure! Do you or your loved one have special abilities? How are your every day activities affected?

 


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Last year Rose Fischer started a Redefining Disability Challenge. This year she is continuing to invite people to join the challenge by blogging about a set of questions she developed. I’ve decided to join this challenge and most Mondays (or Tuesdays!) will be answering one of her questions.

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