Redefining Disability Week 11: Describe a good day living with disability

16 Mar 2015 Ruth L Snyder

A good day with disability

As a mother, I think my dreams and aspirations for my children are fairly normal. I want them to be able to have friends, fit into the community they live in, learn about things they enjoy, and contribute to society. I also want them to know they are loved, accepted, and appreciated – not only by me, but by the community at large.

Last Thursday was a good day. The school our children attend called on Tuesday to let me know a tubing trip was being planned and asked if it would be okay for Luke and Levi to participate. I confirmed I would be happy to have my boys experience the activity with their peers. Thursday morning, Levi said he didn’t want to go. We told him he needed to go any way, because we know that new activities are intimidating for him, but he usually enjoys them once he’s involved. We packed extra snacks, layers of clothes, and talked up how much fun it would be. Both boys left home with smiles on their faces. We heard nothing until about 2 p.m. Then we received pictures from an educational assistant. Both boys had smiles on their faces. The text said, “The boys had an awesome time. They spent every minute tubing.” (Sorry, but I can’t share pictures due to safety concerns with people who’ve been involved with the boys in the past.)

Saturday was another good day. On Friday, Levi told me that he’d like some pie. (I found out later that the math teacher had the students participate in activities that day related to Pi Day.) I told him we could make pies the next day. When it came to making pies, Levi wasn’t interested, but Luke, Jayson, and Dorothy were. Jayson and Dorothy worked together to peel apples. I helped core them and made the pie crust. After I rolled the crust out, Jayson put the apples into the pie and added the sugar, cinnamon, flour, and butter. Then I showed him how to moisten the edges of the crust so that the top crust adhered to the bottom. He also made a pattern on the crust which allowed the steam to escape while the pie was baking. Luke wanted lemon meringue pies. He helped me measure the ingredients into a pot, and stirred for a while. Then he worked with his dad to roll out the crusts while I continued to cook the lemon filling. Both boys were very proud of their pies.

It just so happened that I had an online meeting with executive members from InScribe Christian Writers’ Fellowship on Saturday afternoon. The topic of pies came up and my boys were able to show off their pies. The ladies oohed and ahhed over them. After the meeting, we all enjoyed a bowl of soup and then . . . pie and ice-cream. The smiles of satisfaction were all the thanks I needed. 🙂

Pies for Pi Day

I would love to know how my children would answer this question, but I doubt they would have an answer they could articulate. Since they were born with their genetic make-up, it’s a normal part of who they are; they don’t see themselves as “disabled” – and that’s a very good thing. They would probably describe a good day as having ice-cream, or making a trip to Edmonton. (We go to Edmonton, a 2 1/2 hour drive one way, for appointments at least once a month. Levi especially enjoys watching the vehicles as we drive, and can identify them better than anyone in our family, even Dad! We often go to a toy store after the appointments are done. Sometimes we just look, and other times each of them are able to choose something up to a certain price.)

I’d love to hear what a good day looks like in your world. Let’s celebrate those good days together!


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In 2014, Rose Fischer started a Redefining Disability Challenge. This year she is continuing to invite people to join the challenge by blogging about a set of questions she developed. I’ve decided to join this challenge and most Mondays (or Tuesdays!) will be answering one of her questions.

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