A mission statement is strategic in marketing your company. If someone asks, "What do you?" do you have a concise, powerful answer?

Establishing and Marketing Your Company – 1001 Ways #2

“Any institution worth its salt, any service worth its salt…ought to have a mission that’s brief, that says it all, and that everybody knows.” – Robert Coles, The Ongoing Journey

I appreciate that my very name: Ruth Lucile, prompts me towards a mission statement. Ruth means compassionate and Lucile means bringer of light. My life mission statement is to be a compassionate bringer of light.

In Chapter 3 of 1001 Ways to Market Your Books, John Kremer covers the topic of establishing and marketing your company. Here are some ideas I’m going to try:

BUSINESS CARDS

  • Leave one behind with a tip every time you go to a restaurant
  • On the back of your card, offer a free sample of some kind that relates to your business

BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS (Join those you find helpful)

MARKETING

  • Have your company listed in appropriate industry books
  • Sponsor local events as well as industry awards

…And here’s one last piece of advice from Sir Winston Churchill

What ideas have you been trying lately? I’d love to hear about them in the comments below.

 

 

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Putting your best foot forward: preparing for a writers’ conference

Girl taking a tentative step forward

I’m preparing to attend Write Canada in Guelph, ON from June 12-14. This morning I jotted down items on my “to do” list under “Prepare for Write Canada”. Here are a few things I’m preparing with an explanation of why and how:

  1. Business cardIt’s a good idea to have a business card that you can hand out to other writers, interested agents, or editors you meet. That way they have your contact information and can easily follow up with you. Check out sample business cards on the Tinyprints site if you want some creative ideas.
  2. One Sheet – a basic overview of who you are and what you do. Some people will want more information about you than a business card provides, so a one sheet is a good thing to have with you. The Writer’s Alley gives a good overview of a one sheet and examples for you to see. Jennifer Beever shares some helpful do’s and don’ts from a marketing perspective.
  3. 30-second elevator pitch – This is a 50-70 word description of a book or magazine article idea you want to pitch to an editor. Check out “What’s an Elevator Pitch for Your Book?” for a good overview and links to examples.
  4. Unpublished work for Blue Pencil Review – Holly Case explains, “Back when copy-proofs were still manually cut, pasted, and photographed before printing, a blue pencil was the instrument of choice for editors because blue was not visible when photographed. The editorial intervention was invisible by design.” Some conferences offer an opportunity for you to meet with an advanced writer or editor who will read a sample of your work and offer unbiased suggestions.
  5. 5 minute piece to read – Participating in a reading session allows you to give people a sample of your writing. Make sure you select a reading that is able to stand on its own, but also leaves the reader wanting more.
  6. Published books – Often there is a bookstore at the conference where you’re able to leave your books on consignment. There is usually a fee associated with this service (e.g. at Write Canada the bookstore keeps 25% of the sale price).

Do you have other suggestions to help writers who are preparing for a conference? It’s time for me to get down to work. Maybe I’ll see you at Write Canada.